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Graduation Assessments

Graduation assessments are changing to align with the new curriculum. As part of the updated graduation requirements, students in the 2018 Graduation Program will have to complete two* provincial assessments. They will focus on the demonstration and application of numeracy and literacy.

The numeracy assessment will be introduced in the 2017/18 school year.

The literacy assessment will be introduced in the 2018/19 school year (all Language Arts 12 examinations will continue until that time, and then be phased out in the process). See provincial exam transition and graduation details.

A sample numeracy assessment is posted in the numeracy resource section below. The literacy assessment is still under development.

*Francophone and French Immersion students will complete literacy assessments in both French and English. 

Numeracy assessment – how will it work?

There will be a managed implementation of the numeracy assessment starting with a subset of students writing in January 2018. The Ministry has invited schools to volunteer by October 10 and will confirm participation by October 23. Students in the 2018 Graduation Program who do not write in January will have the opportunity to write in June or August 2018 or a subsequent school year.

The assessment will include several components: pre-assessment activities; sections required by all students; extensive constructed response questions; and a self-reflection component. Students will complete the assessment using a computer, plus paper response sheets for the hand-written components. Find a sample in the resource section below.

Understanding how the components will work:

Pre-assessment activities

  • Preparing for the assessment and activating student thinking– The Ministry of Education will post a series of resources so students and teachers can become familiar with how the assessment works ahead of time. These resources will be posted in advance of the first numeracy assessment in 2017/18, and then available year-round.

Assessment day

  • Questions required by all students –The student will answer 24 questions online.
  • Extensive constructed response questions – The student will choose two of four in-depth questions to answer. The questions will be displayed on the computer screen. The student will show their work and solution on a paper response sheet.
  • Self-reflection component– The student will respond to a series of questions online prompting them to reflect on the assessment and their experience with it.

More questions? Try the Grad Assessment Q&As.

 

Literacy Assessment – how will it work?

The literacy assessment will be introduced in the 2018/19 school year (all Language Arts 12 examinations will continue until that time, and then be phased out in the process).

The literacy assessment is under development. It will include several components: pre-assessment activities; an essential question aspect; a section required by all students; a student choice piece; and a self-reflection component. Further details will be shared as the assessment is developed and finalized.

Understanding how the components will work (a preview):

Pre-assessment activities

  • Preparing for the assessment & activating student thinking– The Ministry of Education will post a series of resources so students and teachers can become familiar with how the assessment works ahead of time. These resources will be posted in advance of the first literacy assessment in 2018/19, and then available year-round.

Assessment day

  • Essential Question –To prime a student’s thinking for the assessment, they will be presented with an “essential question” to consider. They will find this essential question shaping the rest of the assessment.
  • Required by all includes various readings and questions to which all students must respond. The texts represent a variety of sources, from graphics and webpages, to news articles and reports. Materials presented connect to the “essential question.”
  • Student choice (student chooses from one of two options)– allows students to deepen their thinking and analysis around the “essential question.”
  • Self-reflection component– The student will respond to a series of questions online prompting them to reflect on the assessment and their experience with it.

More questions? Try the Grad Assessment Q&As.

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